Wayside Story

Our Story

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WAYSIDE PRINTING WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1921 and so began our journey of excellence in client service, craftsmanship and fine commercial printing.

In 2011, Wayside Printing became…Wayside. The name change better reflected our new direction. While we continue to bring brands to life with the highest quality commercial print, signage and large format services, we also provide a suite of responsive marketing solutions to help brands connect with their customers and stay ahead of the competition in this digital landscape. From direct mail campaigns to email marketing and tradeshow displays to data-driven websites, we help businesses boost both foot traffic and site traffic.

To do that, we bring together an amazing team of designers, press operators and client managers as well as strategic solutions and state-of-the-art technology. While we’ll always pride ourselves on providing the highest quality printing, we also invest strategically in new services that will allow us to meet our clients’ needs.

In 2014, we expanded our large format offerings and acquired Wilde Imagination Sign & Design, a boutique sign shop that combines traditional sign-making skills with modern signage techniques to create unique and impactful signs for our clients.

Today, Wayside has become a trusted marketing partner for businesses across Canada because we continue to deliver on our promise to provide outstanding service as well as measurable, valuable solutions. When clients win, we win.

Years in Business

Locations

Employees

12345

Happy Clients

Meet Our TEAM

Lorna Corman

Client Manager

Marcia Silversides

Client Manager

Michi Miserre

Client Manager

Nancy Wilde

Sign-Maker

Neil Perry

Owner

Richard Finn

Account Manager

Wayside 100 Year History

WAYSIDE PRINTING WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1921 and so began our journey of excellence in client service, craftsmanship and fine commercial printing.

 

The Beginning

100 years ago,

before the C.N. railway connected Vernon and Kelowna, Harold G. Bartholomew (Bart Sr.) and his wife, Ella, moved from Kelowna to Vernon to start Wayside Press. His dream was to create a high-quality, commercial printing plant guided by simple, perhaps old-fashioned principles: honesty and integrity mixed with courtesy and cheerfulness. The business opened up in 1921 on the top floor of a building on 30th Avenue where Sushi 1 Japanese Restaurant now stands.

It started small with just Bart Sr. and his partner Ansell Hillier, a pressman, along with letterpress platen presses and hand set type. Between the two of them, they were well trained and hardworking. Bart Sr. learned his trade as a compositor on Fleet Street in London, England, in a business largely devoted to offices of newspapers and other periodicals. Later, he worked in Kelowna with Len Leathley at Kelowna Printing Company (later Ehman Printworks Ltd., and currently owned by Weskey Graphics) where he met his wife.

1930s

In the Thirties

Bart Sr., Ella, Kay, Bart Jr. and young Wilmot Bruels ran the company.

Bart Sr. was the compositor,
Ella worked in the bindery,
Kay
ran a small 8×10 platen and worked in the bindery,
Wilmot ran the 12×18 platen and
Bart Jr. ran an old automatic Miller.

The latter was also the salesman, calling on all 75 business places in Vernon at the time.

Beneath the press, on the ground floor was the Okanagan bakery which was run by Alice Mann, and the Okanagan Grocery run by Dave McBride. When the letterpress platens were running the walls of the Grocery store would vibrate.

1950s

In the Fifties Bart  Jr sold printing in Vernon, Kelowna and Kamloops.

His biggest customer was Western White Star trucking in Kelowna (now Freightliner). In Kamloops the biggest were Weyerhauser Pulp Mill, their sawmill, the Royal Inland Hospital and a law firm. Over Christmas Holidays Bart Sr. would oil all the wooden floors with heavy oil, including the 18 steps from the street to the printing department. One day there was a fire which destroyed the offset department. The draft caused by the 18 steps powered the fire which the fire chief, Fred Little, said was the hottest fire he had ever attended. He also whispered to Bart Jr. that he (Bart Sr) had caused the fire! The gramophone had short-circuited. The fire was the best thing that ever happened to Wayside – from the insurance Wayside got a brand new Multilith. Later, Bart Sr. bought a used Linotype from New York for $3000.To his great credit he taught himself how to run it, which was incredible.

1970s

Award of Excellence  from the Beckett Paper Company, Hamilton, Ohio, was presented to Wayside Press for the “Creative Use of Paper.” This was followed by numerous over the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s for Excellence in all areas of print (photo of all awards on wall attached)

1990s

1991

Wayside’s 3rd generation owner, Brian (Skip) Bartholomew, was able to present the first copy of the Vernon Chamber of Commerce Membership Guide, to the president and director, due to the new expansion to the building, completed that year.

1994

Proud to receive the gold award from the International Gallery of Superb Printing for Wayside’s Brian Macklin and Mana Powell, for their impressive design of promotional catalog for Sun Rype. If, at that time, there was the notion that there were no high caliber printers in the area, the award would help to conquer that notion.

2010s

2014

Wayside Acquired Wilde Imagination Signs and Designs, putting Wayside into full dimension signs.

2017

Wayside Acquired Electric Paper Company, one of its long time competitors. This added more of a retail element to the business.

2018

Wayside Acquired Lakeside Printing, a long time competitor. This added additional locations in Vernon, Salmon Arm and Revelstoke.

1920s

The Twenties were tough sledding for Wayside.

The local opposition, The Vernon News, which had a commercial printing department, competed fiercely with Wayside by cutting prices. Bart Sr. and Hillier only survived when the Provincial Government called a recount on the voting list for Vernon. Bart Sr. and Hillier worked through Christmas Eve and Christmas Day in order to get it done and get an $800 bonus.

1940s

The 1940s ushered substantial growth,

leading Bart Sr. to purchase the old Baptist Church (corner of 31st Avenue and 31st Street) where Wayside remained until 1965. During this time, Bart Sr. added more presses which included the first offset press in the Okanagan Valley, and a used Multilith. He sent Bart Jr. to Uneeda Press in Vancouver where he got two weeks instruction in running the Multi. In the offset department he had two powerful lights and a big camera. To properly coat the Multi’s aluminum plates he used an old gramophone turn-table in order to evenly spread the coating.

In 1945 Bart Jr. returned from the Air Force and rejoined the firm. He shoveled coal in the basement, took a 5-year apprenticeship from the International Typographical Union (the largest Union in North America and now long out of business) and, as a salesman, called on every business in Vernon.

In addition to everything else, Wayside also got the first fluorescent lights in Vernon.

1960s

The Sixties marked a new venture for Wayside.

In 1965, for $500 Bart bought out a little old lady at the corner of 33rd Street, tore down her little old house and built the first section of the present building.

Joe Gumender, from Switzerland, became the first pressman. He could not speak English and brought an interpreter with him for the interview. Joe’s real love was skiing; he became the first unofficial ski instructor on Silver Star while holding down his job at Wayside.

Next followed Adolf Omota, Arthur Engensperger, Karl Krause, Bodo Niedballa, Brian Macklin, Jack Humphreys and Jack Watters, Roger Henry was plant superintendent for many years and also ran the Linotype.

Adolf was from Austria. He ran three presses at the same time – one being the cylinder which is still in use at Wayside. Adolf retired in 1998 after 33 years at Wayside.

Arthur Engensperger was one of the first Europeans to come to Wayside. He modernized the offset plate-making department and worked there for many years. Karl was originally from Germany. He ran the Multi, the Commander offset and, following the demise of Roger Henry, became plant superintendent. Karl retired in 1999 after 30 years with Wayside.

Bodo ran the Linotype machine. He came to B.C. from Germany and found a job with Ma Murray’s newspaper in Lillooet, then moved to Wayside in ’69 and worked there for 29 years. Until recently Bodo ran the Lino, which had been donated to the Vernon Museum, doing demonstrations and handling out souvenir sheets to kids, with their name on.

 

1980s

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s visit to Vernon in celebration of the City’s 90th year. The Mayor of Vernon at the time sent invites for a luncheon in honor of the Queen and our own Kay Bartholomew was included in the exclusive, honorary list. F.B. Jacques & Son Ltd., a Vernon long time fine jewelry store established in 1889, provided all the table settings and accessories. Mr. Harwood and Mr. Troyer of F.B. Jacques & Son, selected all dated antique items for the Queen’s Table, from the House of Windsor, Leeds, England. Mission Hill Vineyards in Westbank, BC provided a 1981 Gewurztraminer for the occasion.

2000s

Wayside started out strong in the 2001 with a large acquisition in Kamloops, purchasing Peerless Printers from long time owner Tom Fair. This added a tremendous amount of capacity and some incredible talent and started Wayside into Large Format.

With this acquisition we grew by 25% overnight and we have never looked back. We have some long standing clients that we are very proud to continue to support in Kamloops.

2007

Wayside installed a state of the art Heidelberg CD 74 2/4 Perfector. This was a game changer and made us a huge competitor in Western Canada. We could compete with the best and this started growth.

2008

Brian Bartholomew (Skip) sold Wayside Press Ltd to Neil Perry Vice President of Operations and Richard Finn Vice President of Sales and Marketing. Neil and Richard were long time employees, this became a natural succession plan for Skip Bartholomew.

2020s

2020

Neil Perry bought out Richard Finn to become Wayside’s sole owner. Richard Finn remains with the company as a sales rep.

2021

Wayside celebrates 100 years of business in Vernon.

Wayside | Print | Signs | Tech, 100 Year Logo

The Beginning

100 years ago,

before the C.N. railway connected Vernon and Kelowna, Harold G. Bartholomew (Bart Sr.) and his wife, Ella, moved from Kelowna to Vernon to start Wayside Press. His dream was to create a high-quality, commercial printing plant guided by simple, perhaps old-fashioned principles: honesty and integrity mixed with courtesy and cheerfulness. The business opened up in 1921 on the top floor of a building on 30th Avenue where Sushi 1 Japanese Restaurant now stands.

It started small with just Bart Sr. and his partner Ansell Hillier, a pressman, along with letterpress platen presses and hand set type. Between the two of them, they were well trained and hardworking. Bart Sr. learned his trade as a compositor on Fleet Street in London, England, in a business largely devoted to offices of newspapers and other periodicals. Later, he worked in Kelowna with Len Leathley at Kelowna Printing Company (later Ehman Printworks Ltd., and currently owned by Weskey Graphics) where he met his wife.

1920s

The Twenties were tough sledding for Wayside.

The local opposition, The Vernon News, which had a commercial printing department, competed fiercely with Wayside by cutting prices. Bart Sr. and Hillier only survived when the Provincial Government called a recount on the voting list for Vernon. Bart Sr. and Hillier worked through Christmas Eve and Christmas Day in order to get it done and get an $800 bonus.

1930s

In the Thirties

Bart Sr., Ella, Kay, Bart Jr. and young Wilmot Brules ran the company.

Bart Sr. was the compositor,
Ella worked in the bindery,
Kay ran a small 8×10 platen and worked in the bindery,
Wilmot ran the 12×18 platen and
Bart Jr. ran an old automatic Miller.

The latter was also the salesman, calling on all 75 business places in Vernon at the time.

Beneath the press, on the ground floor was the Okanagan bakery which was run by Alice Mann, and the Okanagan Grocery run by Dave McBride. When the letterpress platens were running the walls of the Grocery store would vibrate.

1940s

The 1940s ushered substantial growth,

leading Bart Sr. to purchase the old Baptist Church (now the Vernon Flower Shop) where Wayside remained until 1965. During this time, Bart Sr. added more presses which included the first offset press in the Okanagan Valley, and a used Multilith. He sent Bart Jr. to Uneeda Press in Vancouver where he got two weeks instruction in running the Multi. In the offset department he had two powerful lights and a big camera. To properly coat the Multi’s aluminum plates he used an old gramophone turn-table in order to evenly spread the coating.

In 1945 Bart Jr. returned from the Air Force and rejoined the firm. He shoveled coal in the basement, took a 5-year apprenticeship from the International Typographical Union (the largest Union in North America and now long out of business) and, as a salesman, called on every business in Vernon.

In addition to everything else, Wayside also got the first fluorescent lights in Vernon.

1950s

In the Fifties Bart  Jr sold printing in Vernon, Kelowna and Kamloops.

His biggest customer was Western White Star trucking in Kelowna (now Freightliner). In Kamloops the biggest were Weyerhauser Pulp Mill, their sawmill, the Royal Inland Hospital and a law firm.

Over Christmas Holidays Bart Sr. would oil all the wooden floors with heavy oil, including the 18 steps from the street to the printing department. One day there was a fire which destroyed the offset department. The draft caused by the 18 steps powered the fire which the fire chief, Fred Little, said was the hottest fire he had ever attended. He also whispered to Bart Jr. that he (Bart Sr) had caused the fire! The gramophone had short-circuited. The fire was the best thing that ever happened to Wayside – from the insurance Wayside got a brand new Multilith.

Later, Bart Sr. bought a used Linotype from New York for $3000.To his great credit he taught himself how to run it, which was incredible.

1960s

The Sixties marked a new venture for Wayside.

In 1965, for $500 Bart bought out a little old lady at the corner of 33rd Street, tore down her little old house and built the first section of the present building.

Joe Gumender, from Switzerland, became the first pressman. He could not speak English and brought an interpreter with him for the interview. Joe’s real love was skiing; he became the first unofficial ski instructor on Silver Star while holding down his job at Wayside.

Next followed Adolf Omota, Arthur Engensperger, Karl Krause, Bodo Niedballa, Brian Macklin, Jack Humphreys and Jack Watters, Roger Henry was plant superintendent for many years and also ran the Linotype.

Adolf was from Austria. He ran three presses at the same time – one being the cylinder which is still in use at Wayside. Adolf retired in 1998 after 33 years at Wayside.

Arthur Engensperger was one of the first Europeans to come to Wayside. He modernized the offset plate-making department and worked there for many years. Karl was originally from Germany. He ran the Multi, the Commander offset and, following the demise of Roger Henry, became plant superintendent. Karl retired in 1999 after 30 years with Wayside.

Bodo ran the Linotype machine. He came to B.C. from Germany and found a job with Ma Murray’s newspaper in Lillooet, then moved to Wayside in ’69 and worked there for 29 years. Until recently Bodo ran the Lino, which had been donated to the Vernon Museum, doing demonstrations and handling out souvenir sheets to kids, with their name on.

 

1970s

Award of Excellence  from the Beckett Paper Company, Hamilton, Ohio, was presented to Wayside Press for the “Creative Use of Paper.” This was followed by numerous over the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s for Excellence in all areas of print (photo of all awards on wall attached)

1980s

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s visit to Vernon in celebration of the City’s 90th year. The Mayor of Vernon at the time sent invites for a luncheon in honor of the Queen and our own Kay Bartholomew was included in the exclusive, honorary list. F.B. Jacques & Son Ltd., a Vernon long time fine jewelry store established in 1889, provided all the table settings and accessories. Mr. Harwood and Mr. Troyer of F.B. Jacques & Son, selected all dated antique items for the Queen’s Table, from the House of Windsor, Leeds, England. Mission Hill Vineyards in Westbank, BC provided a 1981 Gewurztraminer for the occasion.

1990s

1991

Wayside’s 3rd generation owner, Brian (Skip) Bartholomew, was able to present the first copy of the Vernon Chamber of Commerce Membership Guide, to the president and director, due to the new expansion to the building, completed that year.

1994

Proud to receive the gold award from the International Gallery of Superb Printing for Wayside’s Brian Macklin and Mana Powell, for their impressive design of promotional catalog for Sun Rype. If, at that time, there was the notion that there were no high caliber printers in the area, the award would help to conquer that notion.

2000s

Wayside started out strong in the 2001 with a large acquisition in Kamloops, purchasing Peerless Printers from long time owner Tom Fair. This added a tremendous amount of capacity and some incredible talent and started Wayside into Large Format.

With this acquisition we grew by 25% overnight and we have never looked back. We have some long standing clients that we are very proud to continue to support in Kamloops.

2007

Wayside installed a state of the art Heidelberg CD 74 2/4 Perfector. This was a game changer and made us a huge competitor in Western Canada. We could compete with the best and this started growth.

2008

Brian Bartholomew (Skip) sold Wayside Press Ltd to Neil Perry Vice President of Operations and Richard Finn Vice President of Sales and Marketing. Neil and Richard were long time employees, this became a natural succession plan for Skip Bartholomew.

2010s

2014

Wayside Acquired Wilde Imagination Signs and Designs, putting Wayside into full dimension signs.

2017

Wayside Acquired Electric Paper Company, one of its long time competitors. This added more of a retail element to the business.

2018

Wayside Acquired Lakeside Printing, a long time competitor. This added additional locations in Vernon, Salmon Arm and Revelstoke.